Tag Archives: Stepper motor

Enclosure for my Arduino and GAUPS

Finishing my ShapeOko rebuild

As the last thing on my to-do list I’ve build an enclosure (or box if you will) for my Arduino and GAUPS shield for my ShapeOko so that it will get out of harms way. Please see this post for an explanation.

I decided to make the enclosure from 10 mm plywood and add two improvements to the electronics: a 24V 60 mm fan to keep the GAUPS shield cool and a kill switch to be able cut the power for the stepper motors.

The result looks like this:

Arduino enclosure.

Arduino enclosure.

Arduino enclosure - other view.

Arduino enclosure – other view.

If you’re interested the dxf-file for the enclosure can be downloaded on my woodworking plans page. I milled a 2mm recess for the Arduino in the bottom of the enclosure so the Arduino would fit without the solderings on the bottom of the Arduino will touch the bottom of the enclosure (see the dxf-file).

Rebuilding my ShapeOko 2 – part 3

If you missed part 2, please find it here.

Finishing the frame

Now I’ve finished the frame, mounted the z-axis gantry and rewired all the stepper motors. It starts to look like a ShapeOko again. 🙂

Z-axis gantry mounted.

Z-axis gantry mounted.

A first test run

My new GAUPS shield has an extra slot for a stepper motor driver which allows for running a dual y operation on separate stepper motor drivers. I didn’t really plan to change the setup I had (running two stepper motors on one driver) but since I’m rebuilding everything, I decided to take the opportunity to try using both drivers for dual y operation.

After connecting everything and switch some wires to make the stepper motors run in the correct direction, I was ready to give it a try:

 

In the video above I’m moving the machine 800 mm on the x-axis, 300 mm on the y-axis and 25 mm on the z-axis just to test that I actually have the working area I expected. 🙂

ShapeOko 2 – Assembly – part 3

If you missed part 2 please find it here.

Z-axis assembly continued

After tapping the MakerSlides it is now time to continue the assembling of the Z-axis rail. I already assembled both the Z assembly carriage and the spindle carriage (see this post) so it’s time for assembling the Z-axis rail and the entire sub gantry comprised of the Z assembly carriage, the spindle carriage, the Z-axis rail and finally the X-axis carriage. All these are bolted together in one sub gantry.

Z-axis rail

First I ran the threaded rod through the Delrin Lead nut several times to make it run as smoothly as possible, then I assembled the motor mount plates, the threaded rod and the stepper motor for the Z-axis. The MakerSlide, the Z-axis carriage and the spindle carriage were then assembled.

Z-axis assembly

Z-axis assembly 1

Z-axis assembly 2

Z-axis assembly 2

And finally the X-axis carriage was mounted.

Z-axis sub gantry

Z-axis sub gantry 1

Z-axis sub gantry 2

Z-axis sub gantry 2

So far – so good. Now it’s time for the entire gantry.

X-axis

The X-axis is comprised of the Z-axis sub gantry, two MakerSlide rails and the two last stepper motor carriages.

X-axis parts

X-axis parts

X-axis assembled

X-axis assembled

Work area

Before assembling the Y-axis (and the entire frame) I had to assemble the work area. The Y-axis rails were partly assembled and loosely attached to the work area before continuing the assembling of the entire frame.

Work area

Work area

The Y-axis rails and the frame completed

The X-axis rail is then mounted on the two Y-axis rails. I used the X-axis gantry to adjust the spacing between the two Y-axis rails so everything runs as smoothly as possible before tightening all the bolts.

The frame

The frame

Mechanical part finished

So I’ve finished the assembly of the mechanical parts and “all” I need is to assemble the electronics, finish the wiring and mount the belts before I can make a test run. I have to say that the instructions are very clear and easy to follow – if I can do it, anybody can! 🙂

ShapeOko 2 – Assembly – part 1

Yes!! It’s finally time to start assembling my brand new ShapeOko 2. 🙂

Getting started

First of all I read all the way through the assembly on this page. It’s quite clear and informative so I guess that assembly will go smoothly. I started by counting everything in the box just to see that everything on the bill of materials was sent from Inventables – it was!

A box of parts

A box of parts

Software and testing the electronics

I installed the Universal G-code Sender as described. Then I unpacked the Arduino, the g-Shield, power supply and stepper motors and assembled the electronics on my desk to give it a test run as suggested. The instruction are clear and everything worked out of the box.

DSC01093

G-shield test

Assembling the wheels

Then it was time to start working on the mechanics by assembling the V-wheels and the smooth idlers – a lot of ball bearings and washers – but just work to be done.

V-wheel assembly

V-wheel assembly

Smooth idlers

Smooth idlers

Assembling carriage

Then it was time for the motor mount carriages – three in total: two for the Y-axis and one for the X-axis.

X-axis parts

X-axis parts

X-axis motor mount

X-axis motor mount

Z-axis assembly

The Z-axis assembly is much more complicated than both the X-axis and Y-axis assembly. It is comprised of several sub-assemblies: the Z assembly carriage, the spindle carriage, the Z-axis rail and finally the X-axis carriage. All these are bolted together in one sub gantry.

In the photo I’ve assembled the Z assembly carriage and the spindle carriage and all the remaining parts (except the X-axis motor mount carriage) are lined up for assembly.

Z-axis sub gantry

Z-axis sub gantry

This is as far as I got today. Now I need to be tapping the MakerSlide to make further progress – a process I’ve never done before so I’ll have to work slowly, carefully and patiently.

Arduino project – box joint jig

My first real Arduino project

Let me introduce my latest project: An Arduino driven box joint jig for my table saw! I saw a video on YouTube where some guy showed a box joint jig driven by a stepper motor and I decided to make one myself.

I already build a hand driven box joint jig very much like this one made by Matthias Wandel (it works fine by the way), so I started to build the electronics using an Arduino One, a 16×2 LCD screen, a Pololu A4988 stepper motor driver shield, a rotary encoder (with a micro switch included), a 18.5 V power supply, a Nema 8 stepper motor (SY20STH30-0604A) and some smaller parts (resistors, an LED, a LM7805 regulator and a capacitor). The whole thing looks like this:

Electronics for my box jointer project

Electronics for my box jointer project

Here is the schematics for it (without the LM7805 regulator and the capacitor):

Schematics for my box jointer project

Schematics for my box jointer project

The rotary encoder is used for controlling the menu (the switch labeled S1 on the schematics is actually built in the rotary encoder). The switches S2 and S3 are used for resetting the jig and for moving the stepper motor forward.

Here’s the sketch (it may be subject to change or include bugs): BoxJoin