Tag Archives: MakerSlide

Rebuilding my ShapeOko 2 – part 2

If you missed part 1, please find it here.

Rebuilding the frame

I ordered 2 MakerSlide rails of length 100 cm, 2 aluminum extrusions 20x20x100 mm and 2 aluminum extrusions 20x20x50 mm as well as screws, belt and other parts.

The main components for my new frame.

The main components for my new frame.

I’ve decided not to shorten any of the aluminum extrusion so my new frame will be 50×104 cm because of the way the corner is assembled. The shorter extrusions are exactly the same length as my y-axis rails so the assembly needs to be as seen in the photo below.

New frame with y-axis rails mounted.

New frame with y-axis rails mounted.

I used extrusion brackets to assemble the corners (they are great) but for some reason I just ordered 6 which isn’t enough: I should have ordered 8 because I need 4 for the corners and 4 for mounting the old extrusions as support for the waste board but I found another solution as you can see later on.

Corner assembled using extrusion bracket.

Corner assembled using extrusion bracket.

To further strengthen the corner of the frame I decided to mount one of the end plate screws in the end of the shorter extrusion (yes, I cut a thread in the end of the extrusions) and the other one in the longer extrusion using a t-slot nut.

Corner assembly seen from the outside.

Corner assembly seen from the outside.

I then shortened the original aluminum extrusion to fit inside the frame and mounted them as support for a new waste board.

Support extrusions mounted.

Support extrusions mounted.

After threading the new MakerSlide rails I mounted them on the x-axis.

X-axis rails mounted.

X-axis rails mounted.

Because of my decision regarding the corner assembly, the MakerSlide rails for the x-axis were not long enough (14 mm to short) and I had to make spacers from the leftovers from my old aluminum extrusions. It seems to work fine. 🙂

X-rail spacers.

X-rail spacers.

Now I need to put the z-axis gantry back on and rewire the stepper motors …

Part 3.

Rebuilding my ShapeOko 2

Rebuilding my ShapeOko 2

As you may have read my GRBL shield broke, my Kress FME 800 spindle is broken and sent back to Germany for repair and I’m in the process of rebuilding my cyclone, so while everything is taken apart, I’ve decided to make my ShapeOko 2 bigger on one axis (the x-axis) so it will be 50×100 cm with a working area of approximately 30×80 cm.

Here are some photos of the process:

My original ShapeOko 2

My original ShapeOko 2.

Spindle mount removed.

Spindle mount removed.

Waste board removed.

Waste board removed.

X-axis removed.

X-axis removed.

Frame taken apart.

Frame taken apart.

My plan is to reuse the black aluminum 20×20 mm extrusions as extra support for a new waste board.

Part 2.

Another rebuild for my ShapeOko 2

Rebuilding the whole thing

As you might have seen in this post, my grbl shield is broken and I’m in the process of replacing it with a gaups shield from ASL. When my new shield is assembled it is my plan to build some sort of casing for it (mostly for protection). Furthermore, I’ve decided to make my ShapeOko 2 larger so I’ve ordered some new parts for it (longer MakerSlides among other things). I then realized that my dust collecting cyclone (made by a friend of mine) has to be remade as well to support the larger ShapeOko 2 in my workshop and to get it out of the way, when I use the ShapeOko. Any project has a tendency to grow on it’s own… 🙂

Cyclone

My old cyclone has been working very well so I’m not going to discard the basic idea: My friend who is a chemical engineer discovered that an empty bottle from a particular brand of soft drink has a cone shape, that fits the theory behind a cyclone very well (actually nearly perfect). Furthermore, it’s my plan to mount it on the wall and use pipes to get the dust collection where I need it, so I went looking for pipes that will fit the hose on my vacuum cleaner. As it turned out a 32 mm plastic pipe fits perfectly.

Bottle and plastic pipe.

Bottle and plastic pipe.

The theory of cyclones

I’m not an expert in cyclones so I went looking for information about cyclones on the Internet and Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth turned out to have a pdf from a course on their homepage, that explains everything very well. Especially the drawing below was helpful:

Standard cyclone dimensions

Standard cyclone dimensions.

Calculations

Since the cyclone diameter D, the dust outlet diameter Dd, the gas outlet diameter De and the cone length Lc all are defined either by my bottle or by the vacuum cleaner hose, the remaining calculations are easy. The values measured on my bottle are:

  • D = 75 mm
  • Dd = 26 mm
  • Dc = 29 mm
  • Lc = 160 mm

This gives the following values:

  • D/D = 1
  • De /D = 0,39
  • Dd /D = 0,35
  • Lc /D = 2,13

These values lies somewhere between (2) and (3) in the standard cyclone dimensions, so I decided to aim at a cyclone with dimensions as an average of the values of (2) and (3). I know it won’t be perfect but hopefully it will work just fine. My calculations are:

Cyclone calculations

Cyclone calculations.

Drawing in OpenSCAD

Then it’s time to make a drawing in OpenSCAD (I love that program). The drawing below is what will become the inside of my new cyclone. Here is the OpenSCAD file: Cyclone and the STL files.

It looks like this:

Cyclone in OpenSCAD

Cyclone in OpenSCAD.

The cone itself and part of the body is made out of my bottle and the top will be milled in wood on my ShapeOko. The top will be four slices 20 mm thick: One with a 32 mm hole for the vacuum cleaner hose, one with a 80 mm (the outer diameter of my bottle) hole holding the bottle and two pieces that glued together will form the inlet. The last two parts look like this:

 

Inlet top part.

Inlet top part (upside down).

Inlet bottom part.

Inlet bottom part.

Milling the parts

I used ArtCAM Express to generate the g-code for milling the parts. The finished result is here:

The four pieces for the cyclone inlet part.

The four pieces for the cyclone inlet part.

Stacked on top of each other.

Stacked on top of each other.

Notice that the inner diameter of the cyclone is 75 mm and the fourth piece has an 80 mm recess for holding the bottle. Furthermore, my calculations above suggested that the value of Lb should be 128 mm but the height of the inlet is about 40 mm, so I cut my bottle at 88 mm from the top of the cone in order to make the entire height 128 mm.

More will follow… 🙂

Part 2.

ShapeOko 2 – Assembly – part 3

If you missed part 2 please find it here.

Z-axis assembly continued

After tapping the MakerSlides it is now time to continue the assembling of the Z-axis rail. I already assembled both the Z assembly carriage and the spindle carriage (see this post) so it’s time for assembling the Z-axis rail and the entire sub gantry comprised of the Z assembly carriage, the spindle carriage, the Z-axis rail and finally the X-axis carriage. All these are bolted together in one sub gantry.

Z-axis rail

First I ran the threaded rod through the Delrin Lead nut several times to make it run as smoothly as possible, then I assembled the motor mount plates, the threaded rod and the stepper motor for the Z-axis. The MakerSlide, the Z-axis carriage and the spindle carriage were then assembled.

Z-axis assembly

Z-axis assembly 1

Z-axis assembly 2

Z-axis assembly 2

And finally the X-axis carriage was mounted.

Z-axis sub gantry

Z-axis sub gantry 1

Z-axis sub gantry 2

Z-axis sub gantry 2

So far – so good. Now it’s time for the entire gantry.

X-axis

The X-axis is comprised of the Z-axis sub gantry, two MakerSlide rails and the two last stepper motor carriages.

X-axis parts

X-axis parts

X-axis assembled

X-axis assembled

Work area

Before assembling the Y-axis (and the entire frame) I had to assemble the work area. The Y-axis rails were partly assembled and loosely attached to the work area before continuing the assembling of the entire frame.

Work area

Work area

The Y-axis rails and the frame completed

The X-axis rail is then mounted on the two Y-axis rails. I used the X-axis gantry to adjust the spacing between the two Y-axis rails so everything runs as smoothly as possible before tightening all the bolts.

The frame

The frame

Mechanical part finished

So I’ve finished the assembly of the mechanical parts and “all” I need is to assemble the electronics, finish the wiring and mount the belts before I can make a test run. I have to say that the instructions are very clear and easy to follow – if I can do it, anybody can! 🙂

ShapeOko 2 – Assembly – part 2

If you missed part 1 please find it here.

Tapping the MakerSlide V-rails

I’ve finished tapping the MakerSlide aluminum V-rails. Although I’m an absolute beginner when it comes to tapping anything, I’ve successfully managed to tap the V-rails for my ShapeOko 2. The tool provided by Inventables was not quite what I expected. The tap itself was fine but the handle wasn’t so easy to attach but I managed to get it done. After that it was a matter of working slowly and patiently especially when stating to tap a new hole.

I used WD40 for lubrication and for every turn forward I made one third of a turn backwards. After reaching the desired depth I used my fingers (no handle) to turn the tap out of the hole, cleaned it and lubricated it again and finally turned it all the way back in the hole and out again to clean up the thread. This way I tapped 18 holes in the MakerSlide V-rails and I’m now ready to continue assembling my ShapeOko 2. 🙂