Tag Archives: Frame

Rebuilding my ShapeOko 2 – part 2

If you missed part 1, please find it here.

Rebuilding the frame

I ordered 2 MakerSlide rails of length 100 cm, 2 aluminum extrusions 20x20x100 mm and 2 aluminum extrusions 20x20x50 mm as well as screws, belt and other parts.

The main components for my new frame.

The main components for my new frame.

I’ve decided not to shorten any of the aluminum extrusion so my new frame will be 50×104 cm because of the way the corner is assembled. The shorter extrusions are exactly the same length as my y-axis rails so the assembly needs to be as seen in the photo below.

New frame with y-axis rails mounted.

New frame with y-axis rails mounted.

I used extrusion brackets to assemble the corners (they are great) but for some reason I just ordered 6 which isn’t enough: I should have ordered 8 because I need 4 for the corners and 4 for mounting the old extrusions as support for the waste board but I found another solution as you can see later on.

Corner assembled using extrusion bracket.

Corner assembled using extrusion bracket.

To further strengthen the corner of the frame I decided to mount one of the end plate screws in the end of the shorter extrusion (yes, I cut a thread in the end of the extrusions) and the other one in the longer extrusion using a t-slot nut.

Corner assembly seen from the outside.

Corner assembly seen from the outside.

I then shortened the original aluminum extrusion to fit inside the frame and mounted them as support for a new waste board.

Support extrusions mounted.

Support extrusions mounted.

After threading the new MakerSlide rails I mounted them on the x-axis.

X-axis rails mounted.

X-axis rails mounted.

Because of my decision regarding the corner assembly, the MakerSlide rails for the x-axis were not long enough (14 mm to short) and I had to make spacers from the leftovers from my old aluminum extrusions. It seems to work fine. πŸ™‚

X-rail spacers.

X-rail spacers.

Now I need to put the z-axis gantry back on and rewire the stepper motors …

Part 3.

Rebuilding my ShapeOko 2

Rebuilding my ShapeOko 2

As you may have read my GRBL shield broke, my Kress FME 800 spindle is broken and sent back to Germany for repair and I’m in the process of rebuilding my cyclone, so while everything is taken apart, I’ve decided to make my ShapeOko 2 bigger on one axis (the x-axis) so it will be 50×100 cm with a working area of approximately 30×80 cm.

Here are some photos of the process:

My original ShapeOko 2

My original ShapeOko 2.

Spindle mount removed.

Spindle mount removed.

Waste board removed.

Waste board removed.

X-axis removed.

X-axis removed.

Frame taken apart.

Frame taken apart.

My plan is to reuse the black aluminum 20×20 mm extrusions as extra support for a new waste board.

Part 2.

Wooden clock – part 4

If you missed part 3 please find it here.

Face of the clock

The clock face

The clock face

Now that I’ve detoured from the plans I decided to continue by making the face of the clock in the shape of a dodecagon without numbers. I made a pine list size 16×25 millimeters and made 12 pieces with a 15 degree angle at both ends and a length of 60 millimeters (the shorter of the two long sides) so that the dodecagon has an inner circumference of 720 millimeters.

I then glued them together as shown in the photo. My intension is to mount the ring on two dowels so it will be lifted about 15 millimeters from the frame. The face of the clock will then be a “floating” dodecagon where the corners represent the numbers 1 to 12.

Wooden clock – part 3

If you missed part 2 please find it here.

Finishing the frame and mounting the gears

The frame is finished with spacers on the backside and holes for the axles. The spacers on the backside are designed to create a space for the pendulum between the frame and the wall.

The frame

The frame

The frame with gears

The frame with gears

In the last photo all the gears are mounted in the frame as a test to see if they will actually work together. I assembled the rest (pendulum and all) and started testing how much weight it takes to run the clock. Brian Law suggests starting with 6 pounds but I chose to start considerably lower with 1 kilo.

Here my first serious setback happened in the project. There is a piece in the shape of a semicircle (number 31 in the plans) that allows the clock to be winded and prevents the spool holding the weight from running backwards. It broke and the weight fell on the floor with a bang! It was simply to tiny to hold the weight.

After a few “blessings” I started all over again with a new spool (number 34 on the plans) and two new gears (numbers 30 and 36 on the plans). I chose to make the spool diameter larger (about 1.5 times the original) and to create a gear with larger teeth than the original (number 36 in the plans). Of course I had to create a new version of number 31 on the plans that will fit my new gear (number 36) and be stronger than the original.

I then reassembled the clock for another test and it actually works. πŸ™‚

Wooden clock – part 2

If you missed part 1 please find it here.

Frame

For the frame of the clock I decided to use a dark hardwood so it would be a contrast to the gears made from birch plywood. I decided to use Itaube, an oil rich type of hardwood from Brazil with a nice reddish brown (sometimes almost orange) color. Most of all I chose that kind of wood because it was the nicest dark wood my local timber yard had in store. πŸ™‚

In Denmark Itaube is mostly used for making terraces because of its durability so the board I bought at the timber yard had grooves on one side (which didn’t suit my purpose very well). What to do? I went to our local carpenter who was kind enough to run it through his planer for me to get rid of the grooves. The board was now just 16 millimeters thick but much nicer than I could have made it myself using a hand held planer. The funny thing is: When you sand Itaube it turns a kind of gray but after a couple of days the reddish brown color comes back (I don’t know why but I guess it has something to do with the oil content).

The backside of the frame looks like an inverted cross with cutouts on both the vertical and horizontal board so the assembled frame has the same thickness as the individual board (that kind of joins probably have a name which I’m not aware of). I made the cutouts using my router table and a hand saw (see photo number 2). On the last photo all the pieces are ready for assembly. I chose to use both dowels and glue for assembling the frame to make it stronger.

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Β Holes for the axles and a first test

The first photo shows the finished frame (assembled but not glued) and all the gears. I chose to drill all the holes in the front and the back at the same time – and one pair at a time! Since my gears are handmade inaccuracies can’t be avoided, so I drilled one pair of holes and used the gears to find the placement of the next pair of holes (see photo number 2).

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