Monthly Archives: February 2014

ShapeOko 2 – Assembly – part 3

If you missed part 2 please find it here.

Z-axis assembly continued

After tapping the MakerSlides it is now time to continue the assembling of the Z-axis rail. I already assembled both the Z assembly carriage and the spindle carriage (see this post) so it’s time for assembling the Z-axis rail and the entire sub gantry comprised of the Z assembly carriage, the spindle carriage, the Z-axis rail and finally the X-axis carriage. All these are bolted together in one sub gantry.

Z-axis rail

First I ran the threaded rod through the Delrin Lead nut several times to make it run as smoothly as possible, then I assembled the motor mount plates, the threaded rod and the stepper motor for the Z-axis. The MakerSlide, the Z-axis carriage and the spindle carriage were then assembled.

Z-axis assembly

Z-axis assembly 1

Z-axis assembly 2

Z-axis assembly 2

And finally the X-axis carriage was mounted.

Z-axis sub gantry

Z-axis sub gantry 1

Z-axis sub gantry 2

Z-axis sub gantry 2

So far – so good. Now it’s time for the entire gantry.

X-axis

The X-axis is comprised of the Z-axis sub gantry, two MakerSlide rails and the two last stepper motor carriages.

X-axis parts

X-axis parts

X-axis assembled

X-axis assembled

Work area

Before assembling the Y-axis (and the entire frame) I had to assemble the work area. The Y-axis rails were partly assembled and loosely attached to the work area before continuing the assembling of the entire frame.

Work area

Work area

The Y-axis rails and the frame completed

The X-axis rail is then mounted on the two Y-axis rails. I used the X-axis gantry to adjust the spacing between the two Y-axis rails so everything runs as smoothly as possible before tightening all the bolts.

The frame

The frame

Mechanical part finished

So I’ve finished the assembly of the mechanical parts and “all” I need is to assemble the electronics, finish the wiring and mount the belts before I can make a test run. I have to say that the instructions are very clear and easy to follow – if I can do it, anybody can! 🙂

ShapeOko 2 – Assembly – part 2

If you missed part 1 please find it here.

Tapping the MakerSlide V-rails

I’ve finished tapping the MakerSlide aluminum V-rails. Although I’m an absolute beginner when it comes to tapping anything, I’ve successfully managed to tap the V-rails for my ShapeOko 2. The tool provided by Inventables was not quite what I expected. The tap itself was fine but the handle wasn’t so easy to attach but I managed to get it done. After that it was a matter of working slowly and patiently especially when stating to tap a new hole.

I used WD40 for lubrication and for every turn forward I made one third of a turn backwards. After reaching the desired depth I used my fingers (no handle) to turn the tap out of the hole, cleaned it and lubricated it again and finally turned it all the way back in the hole and out again to clean up the thread. This way I tapped 18 holes in the MakerSlide V-rails and I’m now ready to continue assembling my ShapeOko 2. 🙂

ShapeOko 2 – Assembly – part 1

Yes!! It’s finally time to start assembling my brand new ShapeOko 2. 🙂

Getting started

First of all I read all the way through the assembly on this page. It’s quite clear and informative so I guess that assembly will go smoothly. I started by counting everything in the box just to see that everything on the bill of materials was sent from Inventables – it was!

A box of parts

A box of parts

Software and testing the electronics

I installed the Universal G-code Sender as described. Then I unpacked the Arduino, the g-Shield, power supply and stepper motors and assembled the electronics on my desk to give it a test run as suggested. The instruction are clear and everything worked out of the box.

DSC01093

G-shield test

Assembling the wheels

Then it was time to start working on the mechanics by assembling the V-wheels and the smooth idlers – a lot of ball bearings and washers – but just work to be done.

V-wheel assembly

V-wheel assembly

Smooth idlers

Smooth idlers

Assembling carriage

Then it was time for the motor mount carriages – three in total: two for the Y-axis and one for the X-axis.

X-axis parts

X-axis parts

X-axis motor mount

X-axis motor mount

Z-axis assembly

The Z-axis assembly is much more complicated than both the X-axis and Y-axis assembly. It is comprised of several sub-assemblies: the Z assembly carriage, the spindle carriage, the Z-axis rail and finally the X-axis carriage. All these are bolted together in one sub gantry.

In the photo I’ve assembled the Z assembly carriage and the spindle carriage and all the remaining parts (except the X-axis motor mount carriage) are lined up for assembly.

Z-axis sub gantry

Z-axis sub gantry

This is as far as I got today. Now I need to be tapping the MakerSlide to make further progress – a process I’ve never done before so I’ll have to work slowly, carefully and patiently.

Wooden clock – part 4

If you missed part 3 please find it here.

Face of the clock

The clock face

The clock face

Now that I’ve detoured from the plans I decided to continue by making the face of the clock in the shape of a dodecagon without numbers. I made a pine list size 16×25 millimeters and made 12 pieces with a 15 degree angle at both ends and a length of 60 millimeters (the shorter of the two long sides) so that the dodecagon has an inner circumference of 720 millimeters.

I then glued them together as shown in the photo. My intension is to mount the ring on two dowels so it will be lifted about 15 millimeters from the frame. The face of the clock will then be a “floating” dodecagon where the corners represent the numbers 1 to 12.